gdirtydime19:

herbal-hippie:

sufliso:

tentacletherapissed:

reminder that these trees are full grown. amazing.

goodbye

a tree is a tree no matter how small

wow

gdirtydime19:

herbal-hippie:

sufliso:

tentacletherapissed:

reminder that these trees are full grown. amazing.

goodbye

a tree is a tree no matter how small

wow

(via psyche-goddess)


aseaofquotes:

Jane Austen, Emma

aseaofquotes:

Jane Austen, Emma

(via aseaofquotes)


nubbsgalore:

photos by (click pic) david mayhewvanessa neufeldblake knapp, brandon goforth, mike hollingshead, dennis oswald, ron gravelle and eric anderson (of two simultaneous tornados over nebraska) 

(via we-are-star-stuff)



yourstoxically:

lesb0:

oceandropsandlove:

want

I would sleep in this until I got too old to climb up the ladder dead ass

Oh my god I need this

(via webecomeone)


pizzaismylifepizzaisking:

ultrafacts:

Source For more facts follow Ultrafacts

Genghis Khan had a government with a code name “yassa” that had a standard of equality towards everybody. He prohibited stealing, defection of soldiers, wife stealing, and other rules which made everything safer. He gave full protection to everybody and had no favorites with anybody.  The Mongol Empire did not emphasize the importance of ethnicity and race in the administrative realm, instead, He believed that appointments and responsibilities should be given by talent and skills not by wealth. 
Mongols were highly tolerant of most religions, and typically sponsored several at the same time. At the time of Genghis Khan in the 13th century, virtually every religion had found converts, from Buddhism to Christianity and Islam. To avoid strife, Genghis Khan set up an institution that ensured complete religious freedom, though he himself was a shamanist. Under his administration, all religious leaders were exempt from taxation, and from public service. Mongol emperors were known for organizing competitions of religious debates among clerics, and these would draw large audiences.

pizzaismylifepizzaisking:

ultrafacts:

Source For more facts follow Ultrafacts

Genghis Khan had a government with a code name “yassa” that had a standard of equality towards everybody. He prohibited stealing, defection of soldiers, wife stealing, and other rules which made everything safer. He gave full protection to everybody and had no favorites with anybody.  The Mongol Empire did not emphasize the importance of ethnicity and race in the administrative realm, instead, He believed that appointments and responsibilities should be given by talent and skills not by wealth. 

Mongols were highly tolerant of most religions, and typically sponsored several at the same time. At the time of Genghis Khan in the 13th century, virtually every religion had found converts, from Buddhism to Christianity and Islam. To avoid strife, Genghis Khan set up an institution that ensured complete religious freedom, though he himself was a shamanist. Under his administration, all religious leaders were exempt from taxation, and from public service. Mongol emperors were known for organizing competitions of religious debates among clerics, and these would draw large audiences.

(via ultrafacts)



ted:

grofjardanhazy:

Evolution of the Desk (1980-2014)

gif: grofjardanhazy, original video via Best Reviews

It’s exciting to see how much technology has changed (and shrunk) in the last twenty-five years. But no app will ever replace adorable pictures of puppies…

This reminded us of Kevin Kelly’s talk about the evolution of technology»

(via we-are-star-stuff)


petitsirena:

sticks and stones may break my bones, but language dictates everything from social norms to legislation and it’s indeed often used to bolster violence and oppression sooOo

(via hayroad)



  1. push yourself to get up before the rest of the world - start with 7am, then 6am, then 5:30am. go to the nearest hill with a big coat and a scarf and watch the sun rise.

    2. push yourself to fall asleep earlier - start with 11pm, then 10pm, then 9pm. wake up in the morning feeling re-energized and comfortable.

    3. erase processed food from your diet. start with no lollies, chips, biscuits, then erase pasta, rice, cereal, then bread. use the rule that if a child couldn’t identify what was in it, you don’t eat it.

    4. get into the habit of cooking yourself a beautiful breakfast. fry tomatoes and mushrooms in real butter and garlic, fry an egg, slice up a fresh avocado and squirt way too much lemon on it. sit and eat it and do nothing else.

    5. stretch. start by reaching for the sky as hard as you can, then trying to touch your toes. roll your head. stretch your fingers. stretch everything.

    6. buy a 1L water bottle. start with pushing yourself to drink the whole thing in a day, then try drinking it twice.

    7. buy a beautiful diary and a beautiful black pen. write down everything you do, including dinner dates, appointments, assignments, coffees, what you need to do that day. no detail is too small.

    8. strip your bed of your sheets and empty your underwear draw into the washing machine. put a massive scoop of scented fabric softener in there and wash. make your bed in full.

    9. organise your room. fold all your clothes (and bag what you don’t want), clean your mirror, your laptop, vacuum the floor. light a beautiful candle.

    10. have a luxurious shower with your favourite music playing. wash your hair, scrub your body, brush your teeth. lather your whole body in moisturiser, get familiar with the part between your toes, your inner thighs, the back of your neck.

    11. push yourself to go for a walk. take your headphones, go to the beach and walk. smile at strangers walking the other way and be surprised how many smile back. bring your dog and observe the dog’s behaviour. realise you can learn from your dog.

    12. message old friends with personal jokes. reminisce. suggest a catch up soon, even if you don’t follow through. push yourself to follow through.

    14. think long and hard about what interests you. crime? sex? boarding school? long-forgotten romance etiquette? find a book about it and read it. there is a book about literally everything.

    15. become the person you would ideally fall in love with. let cars merge into your lane when driving. pay double for parking tickets and leave a second one in the machine. stick your tongue out at babies. compliment people on their cute clothes. challenge yourself to not ridicule anyone for a whole day. then two. then a week. walk with a straight posture. look people in the eye. ask people about their story. talk to acquaintances so they become friends.

    16. lie in the sunshine. daydream about the life you would lead if failure wasn’t a thing. open your eyes. take small steps to make it happen for you.
Sixteen Small Steps to Happiness  (via baimbie)

(via fickleheartwoozyeyes)



aseaofquotes:

Charlotte Bronte, Jane Eyre

aseaofquotes:

Charlotte Bronte, Jane Eyre

(via aseaofquotes)


vwcampervan-aldridge:

Walkway through Grape Vines, Moseley Old Hall, Wolverhampton, England
All Original Photography by http://vwcampervan-aldridge.tumblr.com

vwcampervan-aldridge:

Walkway through Grape Vines, Moseley Old Hall, Wolverhampton, England

All Original Photography by http://vwcampervan-aldridge.tumblr.com

(via webecomeone)


willderness:

letskeepthisasecret-babe:

LOOK HOW HAPPY HE LOOKS

what an ass

(via psyche-goddess)